Taxus cuspidata.

DSCF2780.jpg

During a workshop last year with big Yamadori Taxus, I advised one of my students to take the saw and cut the tree in two pieces. This is the smallest and will become the best. The tree has grown for one summer separated in a pot and this week I start to carf on the big sawmark.

DSCF2787.jpg

I completed the whole carving work and created more depth and movement.

DSCF2788.jpg

From the back side hollow deadwood, movement and no saw marks anymore.

DSCF2789.jpg

After my carving work I gave the power tool to the student to clean it up with a steel brush. And the work for this year is done.  Next year same time we do a wiring, next summer the tree can grow freely without wire or pruning.

Larix Yamadori.

 

L004.JPG

Before a yamadori comes on a workshoptable there are always a couple of years waiting and observing time. They are always coming in in big pots or wooden boxes. We take always 3 years before doing the 1st repotting. After that we let the tree stabilize and look how strong the growth is. This tree was ready for the 1st styling.

L013.JPG

There were many branches in the top starting from the same point. I decide to select the strongest branch to become the most important one. It has to fall down and become the oldest branch, therefore we have to protect the whole branch with double raffia, straight wires and elastic tape.

L016.JPG

After that we created all our deadwood (jins). After making them we protect the whole cambium area with cut paste.

L022.JPG

Bringing the most important branch in position helped us to find the right balance between the angle of the trunk and the main branch.

FOTO 10.JPG

After positioning the main branch we removed all the unnecessary branches and started wiring.

FOTO 13.JPG

Result after the 1st styling. This is never our goal, mostly the branches are bended too hard down for fixation because every time we unwire it never stays in the same position, that’s why we bend down always more than necessary.

P1140469.JPG

About 8 years later; with using the correct techniques, a couple of rewirings and repositioning the tree in the pot there is a mature tree.

P1120197.JPG

Last spring Eric made a presentation with his tree in our Tokonoma during a discussion day about presentations. In a previous post I talked about presentations in the gardens. This is a presentation for exhibitions with the correct table, scroll in the back that tells you something about the season or the place were the tree can stand in nature and than lower an accent plant (in this case a smaller tree).